Ingredients


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    Split green gram with skin

    The Mung bean, also known as green bean, mung, mongo, moong, moog (whole) or moog dal (split) (in Bengali , Marathi), mash bean, munggo or monggo, green gram, golden gram, and green soy, is the seed of Vigna radiata, which is native to Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan. The split bean is known as pesara (Telugu), which is green with the husk, and yellow when dehusked. The beans are small, ovoid in shape, and green in color. The English word "mung" derives from the Hindi: mung. The mung bean is one of many species recently moved from the genus Phaseolus to Vigna, and is still often seen cited as Phaseolus aureus or Phaseolus radiatus. These variations of nomenclature have been used regarding the same plant species. Mung beans are commonly used in Chinese cuisine, where they are called ludòu (literally "green bean"), as well as in Burma (where it is called pe nauk or pe ti), Thailand, Japan, Korea, Philippines, Bangladesh, Pakistan, India, and Southeast Asia. In Vietnam, they are called d?u xanh (again, literally "green bean"). In Indonesia, they are called kacang hijau or katjang idju, and are generally eaten either whole (with or without skins) or as bean sprouts, or used to make the dessert "green bean soup". The starch of mung beans is also extracted from them to make jellies and "transparent" or "cellophane" noodles.