Ingredients



  • Split pigeon peas

    The pigeon pea, also known as toor dal or arhar dal (India), Congo pea or gungo pea (in Jamaica), Pois Congo (in Haiti), gandul (in Puerto Rico), gunga pea, or no-eye pea, (Cajanus cajan, synonyms Cajanus indicus Spreng. (Valder 1895) and Cytisus cajan (Crawfurd 1852)) is a perennial member of the family Fabaceae Pigeon peas are both a food crop (dried peas, flour, or green vegetable peas) and a forage/cover crop. They contain high levels of protein and the important amino acids methionine, lysine, and tryptophan. In combination with cereals, pigeon peas make a well-balanced human food.

  • Spring Onion

    The scallion (also known as spring onion, salad onion, onion sticks, green shallots, siobhes or green onion in many countries) is an edible plant of the genus Allium. The upper green portion is hollow. It lacks a fully developed root bulb. Harvested for their taste, they are milder than most onions. They may be cooked or used raw as a part of salads or Asian recipes. Diced scallions are used in soup, noodle and seafood dishes, as well as sandwiches, curries or as part of a stir fry. To make many Eastern sauces, the bottom quarter-inch of scallions are commonly removed before use. Cut at root level.

  • Spring onion greens

    Also known as scallions or green onions, spring onions are in fact very young onions, harvested before the bulb has had a chance to swell. Both the long, slender green tops and the small white bulb are edible, and are good either raw or cooked. They have a similar flavour to onions, but are much milder. Harvested for their taste, they are milder than most onions. They may be cooked or used raw as a part of salads or Asian recipes. Diced scallions are used in soup, noodle and seafood dishes, as well as sandwiches, curries or as part of a stir fry. To make many Eastern sauces, the bottom quarter-inch of scallions are commonly removed before use. Cut at root level.

  • Star fruit/Carambola

    Carambola, or starfruit, is the fruit of Averrhoa carambola, a species of tree native to the Philippines (where they are called balimbing or saranate, depending on their sourness), Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka. The tree and its fruit are popular throughout Southeast Asia, the South Pacific and parts of East Asia. The tree is also cultivated throughout the tropics, such as in Costa Rica, Peru, Colombia, Trinidad, Ecuador, Guyana, Dominican Republic and Brazil, and, in the United States, in south Florida and Hawaii. The carambola should not be confused with the closely related bilimbi, which is also called belimbing in Indonesia.The fruit has ridges running down its sides (usually five) which in cross-section resembles a star, hence its name. The number of ridges can vary from three to six. Carambola is rich in antioxidants and vitamin C and low in sugar, sodium and acid. It is also a potent source of both primary and secondary polyphenolic antioxidants.A. carambola has both antioxidant and antimicrobial activities: scavenging of NO by the fruit extract is dependent on concentration and stage of ripening. Carambola is a fairly complex fruit with many benefits, but like strawberries, a small percentage of the human population should be cautious of the fruit for health reasons. Carambola contains oxalic acid, which can be harmful to individuals suffering from kidney failure, kidney stones, or those under kidney dialysis treatment. Consumption by those with kidney failure can produce hiccups, vomiting, nausea, and mental confusion. Fatal outcomes have been documented in some patients.

  • Stone apple/Passion fruit

    The nearly round or ovoid fruit, 1-1/2 to 3 inches wide, has a tough rind that is smooth and waxy and ranging in hue from dark purple with faint, fine white specks, to light yellow or pumpkin-color. Within is a cavity more or less filled with an aromatic mass of double walled, membranous sacs containing orange-colored, pulpy juice and as many as 250 small, hard, dark brown or black, pitted seeds. The unique flavor is appealing, musky, guava-like and sweet/tart to tart. The yellow form has generally larger fruit than the purple, but the pulp of the purple is less acid, richer in aroma and flavor, and has a higher proportion of juice (35-38%). Numerous hybrids have been made between purple and the yellow passion fruit, often yielding colors and other characteristic intermediate between the two forms. The vine, especially the yellow form, is fast-growing and will begin to bear in 1 to 3 years. Ripening occurs 70 to 80 days after pollination. Fresh passion fruit is high in beta carotene, potassium, and dietary fiber. Passion fruit juice is a good source of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), and good for people who have high blood pressure. Some research is showing that purple passion fruit peel may help with controlling asthma symptoms.The yellow variety is used for juice processing, while the purple variety is sold in fresh fruit markets.

  • Stone flower

    This is a dried lichen used in Indian cooking. Certainly the only example of a lichen that's used as a spice. It has a characteristic unmistakable woodsy musky earthy smell.

  • Sugar

    Sugar is a term for a class of edible crystalline carbohydrates, mainly sucrose, lactose, and fructose characterized by a sweet flavor. In food, sugar almost exclusively refers to sucrose, which primarily comes from sugar cane and sugar beet. Other sugars are used in industrial food preparation, but are usually known by more specific names—glucose, fructose or fruit sugar, high fructose corn syrup, etc. Sugar is the most simplest form of carbohydrates which serves as a source of quick energy. Usually carbohydrates are stored into glycogens from where the body utilizes the stored carbohydrates for burning fuels in the body during the course of day to day activities. Sugar in beneficial because it is not accumulated as fat in the body. If you consume sugar, it will give you energy and will be utilized when you will carry out any activity. It will only accumulate as fat if it is not burned as energy. Sugar makes the food tasty, gives quick energy and is necessary for the proper development of body organs. However it shouldn't be consumed excessively otherwise it may cause diabetes and obesity.

  • Sugarcane

    Sugarcane refers to any of 6 to 37 species (depending on which taxonomic system is used) of tall perennial grasses of the genus Saccharum (family Poaceae, tribe Andropogoneae). Native to warm temperate to tropical regions of Asia, they have stout, jointed, fibrous stalks that are rich in sugar, and measure two to six meters (six to nineteen feet) tall. All sugar cane species interbreed, and the major commercial cultivars are complex hybrids. In most countries where sugarcane is cultivated, there are several foods and popular dishes derived directly from it, such as: Raw sugarcane: chewed to extract the juice Sugarcane juice: a combination of fresh juice, extracted by hand or small mills, with a touch of lemon and ice to make a popular drink, known variously as usacha rass, guarab, guarapa, guarapo, papelón, aseer asab, ganna sharbat, mosto, caldo de cana, and ????? ?? ??. Cachaça: the most popular distilled alcoholic beverage in Brazil; a liquor made of the distillation of sugarcane Jaggery: a solidified molasses, known as gur or gud in India, traditionally produced by evaporating juice to make a thick sludge, and then cooling and molding it in buckets. Modern production partially freeze dries the juice to reduce caramelization and lighten its color. It is used as sweetener in cooking traditional entrees, sweets and desserts. Panela: solid pieces of sucrose and fructose obtained from the boiling and evaporation of sugarcane juice; a food staple in Colombia and other countries in South and Central America Molasses: used as a sweetener and a syrup accompanying other foods, such as cheese or cookies Rapadura: a sweet flour which is one of the simplest refinings of sugarcane juice Rum: a liquor made of the distillation of sugarcane commonly produced in the Caribbean. Rum is more purified than the Brasilian cachaça. Falernum: a sweet, and lightly alcoholic drink made from sugar cane juice Syrup: a traditional sweetener in soft drinks, now largely supplanted in the US by high fructose corn syrup, which is less expensive because of corn subsidies and sugar tariffs.[citation needed] Rock candy: crystallized cane juice Sayur nganten: an Indonesian soup made of trubuk stem

  • Sun Hemp Seed

    Sun hemp Seeds is a rapid growing crop that is used for fiber production in Indo-Pakistan. It is also good for use as a green manure in many tropical and subtropical areas in the world as an organic and nitrogen source.

  • Sunflower Oil

    Sunflower oil is the non-volatile oil expressed from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds. Sunflower oil is commonly used in food as a frying oil, and in cosmetic formulations as an emollient. Sunflower oil also contains lecithin, tocopherols, carotenoids and waxes. Sunflower oil's properties are typical of a vegetable triglyceride oil. Sunflower oil is produced from oil type sunflower seeds. Sunflower oil is light in taste and appearance and has a high vitamin E content. It is a combination of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats with low saturated fat levels. Sunflower oil is also an ingredient in sunflower butter.