Ingredients



  • Red lentils (Whole)

    Whole Red Lentils are tiny lens-shaped pulses which have traditionally been used as a meat substitute. Lentils should not be eaten raw, due to the presence of anti-nutrients such as phytic acid and tannins; some types of lentils require soaking overnight before cooking as well. The seeds require a cooking time of 10–30 minutes, depending on the variety (shorter for small varieties with the husk removed, such as the common red lentil) and have a distinctive earthy flavor. Lentils are used throughout South Asia, the Mediterranean regions and the Middle East. They are frequently combined with rice, which has a similar cooking time. A lentil and rice dish is referred to in the Middle East as mujaddara or mejadra. Rice and lentils are also cooked together in khichdi, a popular Indian dish; a similar dish, kushari, is made in Egypt and considered one of two national dishes. Lentils are used to prepare an inexpensive and nutritious soup all over Europe and North and South America, sometimes combined with some form of chicken or pork. Dried lentils can also be sprouted by leaving in water for several days. This changes their nutrition profile Lentils contain high levels of proteins, including the essential amino acids isoleucine and lysine, and are an essential source of inexpensive protein in many parts of the world for those who adhere to a vegetarian diet.Lentils are deficient in two essential amino acids, methionine and cysteine.However, sprouted lentils contain sufficient levels of all essential amino acids, including methionine and cysteine. Apart from a high level of proteins, lentils also contain dietary fiber, folate, vitamin B1, and minerals. Red (or pink) lentils contain a lower concentration of fiber than green lentils (11% rather than 31%).Health magazine has selected lentils as one of the five healthiest foods. Lentils are often mixed with grains, such as rice, which results in a complete protein dish. Lentils also have "anti-nutritional factors" such as trypsin inhibitors and relatively high phytate content. Trypsin is an enzyme involved in digestion and phytates reduce the bioavailability of dietary minerals.The phytates can be reduced by soaking the lentils in warm water overnight. Lentils are a good vegetable source of iron. This makes them useful for preventing iron deficiency.[citation needed] Iron is particularly important for adolescents and pregnant women, whose requirements for it are increased. As well as those who have Celiac disease as iron is a common deficiency.

  • Red Snapper

    The red snapper commonly inhabits waters thirty to two hundred feet deep, but some are reported to be caught at three hundred feet deep. All feature a sloped profile, medium-to-large scales, a spiny dorsal fin and a laterally compressed body. The maximum published age of a caught red snapper was reported to be fifty-seven years old. Coloration of the red snapper is light red, with more intense pigment on the back.

    Red snapper are a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally.

  • Refined flour

    All-purpose flour is a blend of hard and soft wheat; it may be bleached or unbleached. It is usually translated as "plain flour." Flour that is bleached naturally as it ages is labeled "unbleached," while chemically treated flour is labeled "bleached." Bleached flour has less protein than unbleached. Bleached is best for pie crusts, cookies, quick breads, pancakes and waffles. Foods made of maida are not considered to be particularly healthy. Still, during festive days, especially in south India, maida is a common ingredient. Maida Flour is nothing but highly refined wheat flour.

  • Rice

    Rice is the seed of the monocot plants Oryza sativa or Oryza glaberrima. As a cereal grain, it is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and the West Indies. It is the grain with the second-highest worldwide production, after maize (corn). Since a large portion of maize crops are grown for purposes other than human consumption, rice is the most important grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by the human species. A traditional food plant in Africa, its cultivation declined in colonial times, but its production has the potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development and support sustainable landcare.

  • Rice flour

    Rice that has been ground into a very fine powder is Rice Flour. Rice flour is primarily made from polished broken rice and is therefore usually whiter than wheat or rye flour, it is usually ground more finely also. Rice Flour can be made from short grain rice which when grinded is very fine in texture whereas rice flour made from long grain rice is used to make a soft, light bread and other baked goods. Depending on the variety of flour used, the consistency of the foods may range from very light and soft to somewhat gritty in texture. The flour is principally starch, plus a small amount of protein. The starch is waxy and makes an excellent gel.

  • Ridge gourd

    It is a dark green, ridged and tapering pretty vegetable. It has white pulp with white seeds embedded in spongy flesh. A ridge gourd also commonly known as Turai or Turiya is a well beloved in India. Its hard skin is peeled off and chopped and cooked as desired. Ridge gourd is low in saturated fat and cholesterol, high in dietary fibre, vitamin C, riboflavin, zinc, thiamin, iron, magnesium and manganese. The nutritional value of gourd makes it suitable for maintaining optimum health and weight loss. It has excellent cooling properties. Parts of the plant are used to create bath or kitchen sponges, a natural remedy for jaundice, furniture and even houses. It is also eaten as a green vegetable.

  • Rock salt

    Halite, commonly known as rock salt, is the mineral form of sodium chloride. Halite forms isometric crystals. The mineral is typically colorless or white, but may also be light blue, dark blue, purple, pink, red, orange, yellow or gray depending on the amount and type of impurities. It commonly occurs with other evaporite deposit minerals such as several of the sulfates, halides, and borates.

  • Rose water

    Rose water is among the most common products received by distillation from rose petals, and it is used in medicine, cosmetics, culinary and so on. Rose water has very pleasant taste and fragrance, and a high quality product includes only distilled water and pure rose essential oil. Top quality rose water was extremely valued in Ancient Persia and Egypt, and it was a key beauty product used by Cleopatra. In Ancient India rose water recipes were used for special religious rituals, and in Ancient Greece and the Middle East rose water was used to enhance the flavor of various exotic foods, especially deserts like the baklava and others.

  • Safflower Seed

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is a highly branched, herbaceous, thistle-like annual, usually with many long sharp spines on the leaves. Plants are 30 to 150 cm tall with globular flower heads (capitula) and commonly, brilliant yellow, orange or red flowers. Traditionally, the crop was grown for its seeds, and used for colouring and flavouring foods, in medicines, and making red (carthamin) and yellow dyes, especially before cheaper aniline dyes became available. For the last fifty years or so, the plant has been cultivated mainly for the vegetable oil extracted from its seeds. In April 2007 it was reported that genetically modified safflower has been bred to create insulin.

  • Saffron

    Saffron is a very costly spice, used to flavor and color food. The spice is actually the dried stigma (tiny threadlike strands) of the Crocus Sativus Linneaus, a member of the iris family. Since the stigmas are hand-plucked from the individual flowers, saffron's high cost becomes more understandable. It is thought that saffron is the most expensive spice in the world. Saffron originated in the middle east, but is now also associated with Greek, Indian and Spanish cuisines. Fortunately, a very little saffron goes a long way — it is a spice to be added one thread at a time. Just a thread or two can flavor and color an entire pot of rice. The flavor is distinctive and pungent. Most 'saffron rice' mixes commercially available actually use a substitute which dyes the rice the distinctive yellow but which does not impart the flavor of true saffron. Saffron is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine, India's traditional system of health that relies on natural products, prevention and balance. It is used in remedies for everything from arthritis and asthma to infertility and impotence. Ancient Egyptians used saffron to treat kidney problems, and there are now research results that might suggest that one of the ingredients in saffron lowers (or assists in lowering) high cholesterol.