Ingredients



  • Mustard oil

    The term mustard oil is used for three different oils that are made from mustard seeds: • A fatty vegetable oil resulting from pressing the seeds, • An essential oil resulting from grinding the seeds, mixing them with water, and extracting the resulting volatile oil by distillation, • An oil made by infusing mustard seed extract into another vegetable oil, such as soybean oil.

  • Mustard seeds

    Mustard seeds are the small round seeds of various mustard plants. The seeds are usually about 1 or 2 mm in diameter. Mustard seeds may be colored from yellowish white to black. They are important spices in many regional foods. The seeds can come from three different plants: black mustard (Brassica nigra), brown Indian mustard (B. juncea), and white mustard (B. hirta/Sinapis alba).

  • Mutton

    Lamb, mutton, and hogget (New Zealand and Australia) are the meat of domestic sheep. The meat of a sheep in its first year is lamb; that of a juvenile sheep older than 1 year is hogget; and the meat of an adult sheep is mutton. Mutton is meat which is harvested from a mature sheep, so it tends to be tough, with a more complex flavor than lamb, meat from younger sheep. Many parts of the world use mutton in their cuisine extensively; the Middle East, for example, is home to many famous mutton recipes.

  • Mutton fat

    Tallow is a rendered form of beef or mutton fat, processed from suet. It is solid at room temperature. Unlike suet, tallow can be stored for extended periods without the need for refrigeration to prevent decomposition, provided it is kept in an airtight container to prevent oxidation. Industrially, tallow is not strictly defined as beef or mutton fat. In this context, tallow is animal fat that conforms to certain technical criteria, including its melting point, which is also known as titre. It is common for commercial tallow to contain fat derived from other animals, such as lard from pigs, or even from plant sources.

  • Noodles

    The noodle is a type of staple food made from some type of unleavened dough which is rolled flat and cut into one of a variety of shapes. While long thin strips may be the most common, many varieties of noodles are cut into waves, helices, tubes, strings, shells, folded over, or cut into other shapes. Noodles are usually cooked in boiling water, sometimes with cooking oil or salt added, but are often pan fried or deep fried. Noodles can be refrigerated for short-term storage, or dried and stored for future use.

  • Nutmeg

    Nutmeg is a spice harvested from plants of the Myristica genus, of which there are about 100 species native to Australia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Nutmeg is derived from the seed of the plant, while the red membrane that covers it is made into the spice mace. Nutmeg is used in a variety of cuisines, and the essential oil of the seed has medicinal applications. In India, nutmeg is commonly used in sweet dishes, but also in a mixture of spices called garam masala. Nutmeg is also an ingredient in Japanese curries. In Western Europe, nutmeg more often appears in savory dishes, including cheese sauces, soups, and potato and meat dishes. Mulled wine or cider also commonly includes nutmeg, along with other spices. Nutmeg can be hallucinogenic or poisonous in large doses, but these are rarely reached accidentally. Nutmeg is chemically similar to the drug MDMA, or ecstasy, in large doses, but it is rarely used recreationally, as it has quite unpleasant side effects and may not wear off for days. Nutmeg poisoning, resulting from quantities over 25 grams, is characterized by body aches, convulsions, dehydration, heart palpitations, nausea, and severe depression.

  • Nutmeg powder

    Nutmeg powder is a very pleasing spice to have in the pantry. It adds a sweetness and warmth to sweet and savoury dishes. One wholenutmeg yields two to three teaspoons of ground nutmeg. Nutmeg compliments beef, seafood, veal, vegetables, starch, tomatoes, white sauce, quiche's, curries, moussakas, stewed fruits, biscuits, cakes and milk puddings.

  • Nuts

    A nut is a hard-shelled fruit of some plants having an indehiscent seed. While a wide variety of dried seeds and fruits are called nuts in English, only a certain number of them are considered by biologists to be true nuts. Nuts are an important source of nutrients for both humans and wildlife.Nuts are a composite of the seed and the fruit, where the fruit does not open to release the seed. Most seeds come from fruits, and the seeds are free of the fruit, unlike nuts like hazelnuts, hickories, chestnuts and acorns, which have a stony fruit wall and originate from a compound ovary. Culinary usage of the term is less restrictive, and some nuts as defined in food preperation, like pistachios and Brazil nuts, are not nuts in a biological sense. Everyday common usage of the term often refers to any hard walled, edible kernel, as a nut.

  • Oils

    An oil is any substance that is liquid at ambient temperatures and is hydrophobic but soluble in organic solvents. Oils have a high carbon and hydrogen content and are nonpolar substances. The general definition above includes compound classes with, and uses, including vegetable oils, petrochemical oils, and volatile essential oils. All oils can be traced back to organic sources.

    Cooking oil is purified fat of plant origin, which is usually liquid at room temperature (saturated oils such as coconut and palm are more solid at room temperature than other oils).

    Some of the many different kinds of edible vegetable oils include: olive oil, palm oil, soybean oil, canola oil, pumpkin seed oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, peanut oil, grape seed oil, sesame oil, argan oil and rice bran oil. Many other kinds of vegetable oils are also used for cooking.

    The generic term "vegetable oil" when used to label a cooking oil product may refer to a specific oil (such as rapeseed oil) or may refer to a blend of a variety of oils often based on palm, corn, soybean or sunflower oils.

    Oil can be flavored by immersing aromatic food stuffs such as fresh herbs, peppers, garlic and so forth in the oil for a period of time. However, care must be taken when storing flavored oils.

  • Olive Oil

    Olive oil is an oil obtained from the olive (Olea europaea; family Oleaceae), a traditional tree crop of the Mediterranean Basin. It is commonly used in cooking, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and soaps and as a fuel for traditional oil lamps. Olive oil is used throughout the world, but especially in the Mediterranean countries. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that a higher proportion of monounsaturated fats in the diet is linked with a reduction in the risk of coronary heart disease. This is significant because olive oil is considerably rich in monounsaturated fats, most notably oleic acid.