Ingredients



  • Millet flour

    Millet flour is flour made from the grain millet, which actually comes in a variety of types. It’s an uncommon flour to use in the US, though it is beginning to gain in popularity since it is gluten free. This flour may be added to breads to reduce gluten content, or to produce lower carbohydrate bread, and the grain itself, though often thought of as the perfect birdseed, has an extensive history as an important whole grain in cooking, particularly in Asia, where millet may once have been used more extensively than rice.

  • Minced mutton

    Minced mutton contains lean meat and trimmings from the leg, loin, rib, shoulder, flank, neck, breast, or shank. It is mechanically minced and sold in bulk or in patty form. The meat is finely chopped and minced or ground by a meat grinder. In South Asia both lamb and goat meat are minced to produce keema, though the process of mincing is manual.Minced mutton is usually prepared by braising, broiling, grilling, panbroiling, panfrying, roasting, or baking.

  • Mineral Water

    Water plays many critical roles within the field of food science. It is important for a food scientist to understand the roles that water plays within food processing to ensure the success of their products.

    Boiling, steaming, and simmering are popular cooking methods that often require immersing food in water or its gaseous state, steam. Water is also used for dish-washing.

    Drinking water helps you lose weight because it flushes down the by-products of fat breakdown. Drinking water reduces hunger, it's an effective appetite suppressant so you'll eat less. Plus, water has zero calories.

    Drinking water raises your metabolism because it helps in digestion. Fiber and water goes hand in hand so that you can have your daily bowel movement.

  • Mint leaves (Fresh)

    Mentha (also known as Mint, from Greek míntha, Linear B mi-ta) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae (mint family). The species are not clearly distinct and estimates of the number of species varies from 13 to 18. Hybridization between some of the species occurs naturally. Many other hybrids as well as numerous cultivars are known in cultivation. The genus has a subcosmopolitan distribution across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and North America. Mints are aromatic, almost exclusively perennial, rarely annual, herbs. They have wide-spreading underground and overground stolons and erect, square, branched stems. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, from oblong to lanceolate, often downy, and with a serrate margin. Leaf colors range from dark green and gray-green to purple, blue, and sometimes pale yellow. The flowers are white to purple and produced in false whorls called verticillasters. The corolla is two-lipped with four subequal lobes, the upper lobe usually the largest. The fruit is a small, dry capsule containing one to four seeds. While the species that make up the Mentha genus are widely distributed and can be found in many environments, most Mentha grow best in wet environments and moist soils. Mints will grow 10–120 cm tall and can spread over an indeterminate area. Due to their tendency to spread unchecked, mints are considered invasive

  • Miscellaneous

    This section contains various food items under the Miscellaneous section of the recipe upload (ingredients) menu.

  • Mixed Spices

    The composition of garam masala differs regionally, with wide variety across India. Some common ingredients are black & white peppercorns, cloves, malabar leaves, mace blades, black & white cumin seeds, cinnamon, black, brown & green cardamom pods, nutmeg, star anise, and coriander seeds. This is a typical Punjabi version of garam masala. Varying combinations of these and other spices are used in different garam masala recipes in accordance to region and personal taste, and none is considered more authentic than another. The components of the mix are toasted, then ground together.

    Garam masala is available as a commercially-prepared ground mixture. Many such mixtures may include a higher proportion of less-expensive spices and may contain dried red chili peppers, dried garlic, ginger powder, sesame, mustard seed, turmeric, coriander, malibar leaves, star anise and fennel. While commercial garam masala preparations can be bought ready ground, like all ground spice they do not keep well and soon lose much of their aroma. Whole spices, which keep fresh much longer, can be ground when needed using a mortar and pestle or electric coffee grinder. When commercially ground garam masala is used in dishes, it is often added at the end of cooking so that the remaining aroma is not lost. Whole garam masala, however, is added early to the cooking fat, oil, or ghee for a more pungent flavour.

  • Mung Dal

    The mung bean, also known as mungbean, mung, green gram, golden gram; or in other languages, choroko (in Swahili), mongo, moong, moog (whole) or moog dal (split) (in Bengali , Marathi), munggo or monggo (in East Timor), is the seed of Vigna radiata. In Tamil it is known as paccaippayaru.

    The mung bean is one of many species recently moved from the genus Phaseolus to Vigna, and is still often seen cited as Phaseolus aureus or Phaseolus radiatus. These variations of nomenclature have been used regarding the same plant species.

  • Mushrooms

    A mushroom is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. Like all fungi, mushrooms are not plants and do not undergo photosynthesis. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) or pores on the underside of the cap."Mushroom" describes a variety of gilled fungi, with or without stems, and the term is used even more generally, to describe both the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota and the woody or leathery fruiting bodies of some Basidiomycota, depending upon the context of the word.Forms deviating from the standard morphology usually have more specific names, such as "puffball", "stinkhorn", and "morel", and gilled mushrooms themselves are often called "agarics" in reference to their s

  • Musk Melon

    Muskmelon (Cucumis melo) is a species of melon that has been developed into many cultivated varieties. These include smooth skinned varieties such as honeydew, crenshaw and casaba, and different netted cultivars (cantaloupe, Persian melon and Santa Claus or Christmas melon). The Armenian cucumber is also a variety of muskmelon, but its shape, taste, and culinary uses more closely resemble those of a cucumber. The large number of cultivars in this species approaches that found in wild cabbage, though morphological variation is not as extensive. It is a fruit of a type that botanists call a pepo. Muskmelon is native to Persia (Iran) and adjacent areas on the west and the east. Persia and the trans-Caucasus are believed to be the main center of origin and development, with a secondary center including the northwest provinces of India, also Kashmir and Afghanistan.

  • Mussels/Clams

    The common name mussel is used for members of several families of clams or bivalvia mollusca, from saltwater and freshwater habitats. These groups have in common a shell whose outline is elongated and asymmetrical compared with other edible clams, which are often more or less rounded or oval. The word "mussel" is most frequently used to mean the edible bivalves of the marine family Mytilidae, most of which live on exposed shores in the intertidal zone, attached by means of their strong byssal threads ("beard") to a firm substrate. A few species (in the genus Bathymodiolus) have colonised hydrothermal vents associated with deep ocean ridges. In most marine mussels the shell is longer than it is wide, being wedge-shaped or asymmetrical. The external colour of the shell is often dark blue, blackish, or brown, while the interior is silvery and somewhat nacreous. The word "mussel" is also used for many freshwater bivalves, including the freshwater pearl mussels. Freshwater mussel s