Ingredients



  • Chicken

    The chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is a domesticated fowl, a subspecies of the Red Junglefowl. As one of the most common and widespread domestic animals, and with a population of more than 24 billion in 2003, there are more chickens in the world than any other species of bird. Humans keep chickens primarily as a source of food, consuming both their meat and their eggs. Chicken eggs are widely used in many types of dishes, both sweet and savory, including many baked goods. The meat of the chicken, also called "chicken", is a type of poultry meat. Because of its relatively low cost, chicken is one of the most used meats in the world. Nearly all parts of the bird can be used for food, and the meat can be cooked in many different ways. Popular chicken dishes include roasted chicken, fried chicken, chicken soup, Buffalo wings, tandoori chicken, butter chicken, and chicken rice. Chicken is also a staple of many fast food restaurants.

  • Chicken breasts

    Boneless chicken breasts fit into almost any meal plan, and they're economical, low in fat, and easy to prepare. If you can't find boneless chicken breasts on sale, the packaged frozen ones available in most stores are usually a real value. They're perfect for salads, skillet dinners, casseroles and pasta dishes, and do well in many crockpot dishes.

  • Chicken pieces

    Most familiar and easy chicken recipes -- like baked chicken, fried chicken, or chicken cacciatore -- call for "chicken pieces." But stores charge extra for doing the knife work. You can save money by cutting up a whole chicken at home rather than buying chicken pieces pre-cut and packaged at the supermarket.

  • Chicken wings and shoulder

    Most familiar and easy chicken recipes -- like baked chicken, fried chicken, or chicken cacciatore -- call for "chicken pieces." But stores charge extra for doing the knife work. You can save money by cutting up a whole chicken at home rather than buying chicken pieces pre-cut and packaged at the supermarket.

  • Chickpeas

    The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) (also garbanzo bean, Indian pea, ceci bean, Bengal gram) is an edible legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Chickpeas are high in protein and one of the earliest cultivated vegetables; 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East

  • Chocolate

    Chocolate is a raw or processed food produced from the seed of the tropical Theobroma cacao tree. Cacao has been cultivated for at least three millennia in Mexico, Central and South America, with its earliest documented use around 1100 BC. The majority of the Meso-american people made chocolate beverages, including the Aztecs, who made it into a beverage known as xocolatl, a Nahuatl word meaning "bitter water". The seeds of the cacao tree have an intense bitter taste, and must be fermented to develop the flavor.

  • Cinnamon

    Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several trees from the genus Cinnamomum that is used in both sweet and savoury foods. Cinnamon trees are native to South East Asia, and its origin was mysterious in Europe until the sixteenth century. Cinnamon bark is widely used as a spice. It is principally employed in cookery as a condiment and flavoring material. It is used in the preparation of chocolate, especially in Mexico, which is the main importer of true cinnamon. It is also used in many desserts recipes, such as apple pie, donuts, and cinnamon buns as well as spicy candies, tea, hot cocoa, and liqueurs. True cinnamon, rather than cassia, is more suitable for use in sweet dishes.

  • Cinnamon powder

    Cinnamon powder has long been an important spice in Persian cuisine, used in a variety of thick soups, drinks, and sweets. It is often mixed with rosewater or other spices to make a cinnamon-based curry powder for stews or just sprinkled on sweet treats. It is also used in Sambar powder or BisiBelebath powder in Karnataka, which gives it a rich aroma and tastes unique.

  • Cinnamon-green cardamom powder

    This herb is commonly known as choti elachi or green cardamom used as flavorings in both food and drink, as cooking spices and as a medicine. Packed properly, this range is known for its unique taste and aromatic fragrance which make it highly popular across the globe.

  • Citric acid

    Citric acid is a weak organic acid. It is a natural preservative and is also used to add an acidic, or sour, taste to foods and soft drinks. In biochemistry, it is important as an intermediate in the citric acid cycle, and therefore occurs in the metabolism of virtually all living things. It can also be used as an environmentally benign cleaning agent. Citric acid exists in greater than trace amounts in a variety of fruits and vegetables, most notably citrus fruits. Lemons and limes have particularly high concentrations of the acid; it can constitute as much as 8% of the dry weight of these fruits (about 47 g/L in the juices[4]). The concentrations of citric acid in citrus fruits range from 0.005 mol/L for oranges and grapefruits to 0.30 mol/L in lemons and limes. Within species, these values vary depending on the cultivar and the circumstances in which the fruit was grown