Ingredients



  • Butter

    Butter is a dairy product made by churning fresh or fermented cream or milk. It is generally used as a spread and a condiment, as well as in cooking applications, such as baking, sauce making, and pan frying. Butter consists of butterfat, water and milk proteins. Most frequently made from cows' milk, butter can also be manufactured from the milk of other mammals, including sheep, goats, buffalo, and yaks. Salt, flavorings and preservatives are sometimes added to butter. Rendering butter produces clarified butter or ghee, which is almost entirely butterfat. Butter is a water-in-oil emulsion resulting from an inversion of the cream, an oil-in-water emulsion; the milk proteins are the emulsifiers. Butter remains a solid when refrigerated, but softens to a spreadable consistency at room temperature, and melts to a thin liquid consistency at 32–35 °C (90–95 °F).

  • Button mushrooms

    Agaricus bisporus—known variously as the common mushroom, button mushroom, white mushroom, table mushroom, champignon mushroom, crimini mushroom, Swiss brown mushrooms, Roman brown mushrooms, Italian brown, Italian mushroom, cultivated mushroom, or when mature, the Portobello mushroom—is an edible basidiomycete mushroom native to grasslands in Europe and North America. Agaricus bisporus is cultivated in more than 70 countries and is one of the most commonly and widely consumed mushrooms in the world. These mushrooms can contain high amounts of Vitamin D, especially when UV-irradiated.

  • Cabbage

    Cabbage is a popular cultivar of the species Brassica oleracea Linne (Capitata Group) of the Family Brassicaceae (or Cruciferae) and is used as a leafy green vegetable. It is a herbaceous, biennial, dicotyledonous flowering plant distinguished by a short stem upon which is crowded a mass of leaves, usually green but in some varieties red or purplish, which while immature form a characteristic compact, globular cluster (cabbagehead).

  • Caraway seeds

    Caraway (Carum carvi) also known as meridian fennel, or Persian cumin, is a biennial plant in the family Apiaceae, native to western Asia, Europe and Northern Africa. The plant is similar in appearance to a carrot plant, with finely divided, feathery leaves with thread-like divisions, growing on 20–30 cm stems. The main flower stem is 40–60 cm tall, with small white or pink flowers in umbels. Caraway fruits (erroneously called seeds) are crescent-shaped achenes, around 2 mm long, with five pale ridges

  • Cardamom powder

    It is made by grinding the small green cardamoms, skin and all. You need to sieve it through a fine sieve, to remove all fiber and to get the fine powder you were given. It is the ground skin that gives them the slightly green/beige colour that you describe. The skin of green cardamom (and brown cardamom) is edible. They are chewed whole, the small green ones, as an after meal mouth fresheners all over India.

  • Cardamoms

    Cardamom is native to the evergreen forests of India. This spice is commonly used in Indian cuisine, but it has also made its way into Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for mouth ulcers, digestive problems, and even depression. Cardamom has a strong, unique taste, with an intensely aromatic, resinous fragrance. Black cardamom has a distinctly more smokey, though not bitter, aroma, with a coolness some consider similar to mint. Green cardamom is one of the most expensive spices by weight, but little is needed to impart flavor. It is best stored in pod form because once the seeds are exposed or ground, they quickly lose their flavor.

    Green cardamom is a common ingredient in Indian cooking and is often used as a spice for sweet dishes, as well as traditional flavouring in coffee and tea. Black cardamom is sometimes used in garam masala for curries. It is occasionally used as a garnish in basmati rice and other dishes.

    Green cardamom is broadly used in South Asia to treat infections in teeth and gums, to prevent and treat throat troubles, congestion of the lungs and pulmonary tuberculosis, inflammation of eyelids and also digestive disorders. It also is used to break up kidney stones and gall stones. Cardamom fights against gas and helps to relieve gas and heart burn. It supports the detoxification process of the body and helps to filter the entire body.

  • Cardamoms (Black)

    Black cardamom (also known as brown cardamom, elaichi) is a plant in the family Zingiberaceae. Its seed pods have a strong camphor-like flavor, with a smoky character derived from the method of drying.

  • Carom seed powder

    Carom seeds are called 'Ajwain' in India and resemble cumin seeds in their appearance. However, the size of these seeds is smaller than cumin seeds. They have a strong fragrance and are similar to thyme in taste, although stronger in flavor. You can use whole carom seeds as well as grind them to a powder. If you want to use them as a powder, it is recommended to buy them and grind them at home. The usage of carom seeds in garnishing the dishes vary from one region to another. However, the use of these seeds are particularly popular in the northern part of the country, and thus, you will find the presence of carom seeds in many North Indian dishes as compared to other regions.

  • Carom seeds

    Carom seeds are called 'Ajwain' in India and resemble cumin seeds in their appearance. However, the size of these seeds is smaller than cumin seeds. They have a strong fragrance and are similar to thyme in taste, although stronger in flavor. You can use whole carom seeds as well as grind them to a powder. If you want to use them as a powder, it is recommended to buy them and grind them at home. The usage of carom seeds in garnishing the dishes vary from one region to another. However, the use of these seeds are particularly popular in the northern part of the country, and thus, you will find the presence of carom seeds in many North Indian dishes as compared to other regions.

  • Carrot

    The carrot is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, red, white, and yellow varieties exist. It has a crisp texture when fresh. In India carrots are used in a variety of ways, as salads or as vegetables added to spicy rice or daal dishes. The most popular variation in north India is the Gaajar Kaa Halwaa carrot dessert, which has carrots grated and cooked in milk until the whole mixture is solid, after which nuts and butter are added. Carrot salads are usually made with grated carrots in western parts with a seasoning of mustard seeds and green chillies popped in hot oil, while adding carrots to rice usually is in julienne shape.

    The carrot gets its characteristic and bright orange colour from ß-carotene, which is partly metabolised into vitamin A in humans. Carrots are also rich in dietary fibre, antioxidants, and minerals. Ethnomedically, the roots are used to treat digestive problems, intestinal parasites, and tonsillitis or constipation. Lack of vitamin A can cause poor vision, including night vision, and vision can be restored by adding it back into the diet. Eating large amounts of carrots will allow one to see in the dark.

    The high level of beta-carotene acts as an antioxidant to cell damage done to the body through regular metabolism. It help slows down the aging of cells. Carrots are known by herbalists to prevent infection. They can be used on cuts – shredded raw or boiled and mashed. It's all in the crunch! Carrots clean your teeth and mouth. They scrape off plaque and food particles just like toothbrushes or toothpaste. Carrots stimulate gums and trigger a lot of saliva, which being alkaline, balances out the acid-forming, cavity-forming bacteria. The minerals in carrots prevent tooth damage.