Ingredients



  • Boneless chicken

    Boneless, skinless chicken breasts are one of the most convenient meats available in your supermarket. There are so many recipes for chicken breasts. They taste delicious, and are tender and juicy if cooked properly. As an added bonus, kids love chicken!

  • Bottle gourd

    The calabash or bottle gourd or opo squash or long melon (not to be confused with the calabaza) is a vine grown for its fruit, which can either be harvested young and used as a vegetable or harvested mature, dried, and used as a bottle, utensil, or pipe. For this reason, one of the calabash subspecies which is longer and slimmer is known as the bottle gourd. The fresh fruit has a light green smooth skin and a white flesh. However the rounder varieties are called Calabash gourds.

  • Bread

    Bread is a staple food prepared by cooking a dough of flour and water and often, additional ingredients. Doughs are usually baked, but in some cuisines breads are steamed, fried, or baked on an unoiled skillet. Salt, fat and leavening agents such as yeast and baking soda are common ingredients, though bread may contain other ingredients, such as milk, egg, sugar, spice, fruit (such as raisins), vegetables (such as onion), nuts (such as walnuts) or seeds (such as poppy). Referred to colloquially as the "staff of life", bread has been prepared for at least 30,000 years. Fresh bread is prized for its taste, aroma, quality, appearance and texture. Retaining its freshness is important to keep it appetizing The soft, inner part of bread is known to bakers and other culinary professionals as the crumb, which is not to be confused with small bits of bread that often fall off, called crumbs. The outer hard portion of bread is called the crust.

  • Brinjal

    The eggplant, aubergine, melongene, brinjal, or guinea squash (Solanum melongena) is a plant of the family Solanaceae (also known as the nightshades) and genus Solanum. It bears a fruit of the same name, commonly used in cooking. As a nightshade, it is closely related to the tomato and potato and is native to Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. It is a delicate perennial often cultivated as an annual. It grows 40 to 150 cm (16 to 57 in) tall, with large coarsely lobed leaves that are 10 to 20 cm (4–8 in) long and 5 to 10 cm (2–4 in) broad. Semiwild types can grow much larger, to 225 cm (7 ft) with large leaves over 30 cm (12 in) long and 15 cm (6 in) broad. The stem is often spiny. The flowers are white to purple, with a five-lobed corolla and yellow stamens. The fruit is fleshy, has a meaty texture, and is less than 3 centimetres (1.2 in) in diameter on wild plants, but much larger in cultivated forms.

  • Broad beans

    Broad Bean, Fava Bean, Field Bean, Bell Bean or Tic Bean, is a species of bean (Fabaceae) native to north Africa and southwest Asia, and extensively cultivated elsewhere.The fruit is a broad leathery pod, green maturing to blackish-brown, with a densely downy surface; in the wild species, the pods are 5–10 cm long and 1 cm diameter, but many modern cultivars developed for food use have pods 15–25 cm long and 2–3 cm thick. Each pod contains 3-8 seeds; round to oval and 5–10 mm diameter in the wild plant, usually flattened and up to 20–25 mm long, 15 mm broad and 5–10 mm thick in food cultivars.

  • Broccoli florets

    Broccoli is a cool-season crop that, like spinach, can be grown in the spring or fall. In fact, you may be able to get a continual harvest throughout both seasons if you time planting correctly. A member of the cabbage family, broccoli is rich in vitamins. Broccoli has been called a miracle food.

    It is thought that increasing broccoli in your diet may help to slow down and even prevent osteoarthritis. Sulforaphane in broccoli has also been shown to kill cancer stem cells, thereby striking to the root of tumor growth. Sulforaphane in broccoli may also significantly improve your blood pressure and kidney function. Eating vegetables that contain sulforaphane, such as broccoli, could quite literally slow down the hands of time.

    Beta-carotene and vitamin C, present in abundance in broccoli, are important antioxidants that have been linked to a reduced risk of numerous conditions, including cataracts, heart disease, and several cancers.

    Broccoli has some special cholesterol-lowering benefits if you cook it by steaming. The fiber-related components in broccoli do a better job of binding together with bile acids in your digestive tract when they've been steamed. Broccoli can help you overcome vitamin D deficiency.

  • Brown Mustard Seed

    A variety of mustard seed that is smaller and has a much stronger flavor than white mustard seeds. Brown mustard seeds can be sold whole and used as a seasoning, ground into a powder, or used in the production of a variety of European and Asian prepared mustards. If stored in a cool dark place, brown mustard seeds will remain usable for a year or more.

  • Brown Sesame Seed

    These small tasty, unhulled seeds are used in cereals, crackers, spreads, drinks, casseroles, granola, candies, soups, salads, fish and baked goods. Delicious when toasted and sprinkled on grains or main dishes. Known as tahini when ground into a butter. A nutritious mayonnaise substitute may be made by simply blending sesame seeds with water (1 part seeds to about 2 cups water), season to taste.

  • Browned onion paste

    Yellow or Spanish onions are referred to as brown onions. The inside of the onion is not brown. The act of cooking the onion is what turns the paste brown, so depending on how you would like your paste to taste, choose hot, mild, or sweet onions, or use a combination

  • Buckwheat

    Buckwheat refers to a variety of plants in the dicot family Polygonaceae: the Eurasian genus Fagopyrum, the North American genus Eriogonum, and the Northern Hemisphere genus Fallopia. Either of the latter two may be referred to as "wild buckwheat".